Archive for March, 2010

April & May Long Range Forecast
March 31, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News for the latest on the weekend rain chances***

Thank for stopping by the Weather Watch 12 blog. Each day we strive to give you weather information that you will find no where else in Southeast Wisconsin. In today’s entry I will discuss the weather pattern for the next two months and also provide temperature and precipitation forecasts thru the end of May. This is a lengthy entry…but worth your time.

Since arriving at WISN back in December I have been providing long range forecasts exclusively in our blog. The long range forecasts that I make are based based on the LRC, which is a weather pattern theory that I learned about while working in Kansas City. For a great example of this theory and how it relates to our current warm-up in Milwaukee…just check the blog entry from Tuesday.

Here is what the theory states:

  • A unique weather pattern sets up every year between October 1st and November 10th
  • The weather pattern cycles, repeats, and continues through winter, spring and into summer. Identifying the cycle length helps tremendously when making long range weather predictions.
  • Long term long-wave troughs and ridges become established and also repeat at regular times within the cycle. These dominant repeating features are a clue to where storm systems will reach peak strength, and where they will be their weakest.
  • The LRC is a winter/spring/early summer-long pattern! There is a pattern! It isn’t just one long-wave trough, storm system, or ridge. It is a sequence of troughs and ridges that are cycling across the Northern Hemisphere.

As I have mentioned many times, this year’s cycling weather pattern is on roughly a 60-62 day cycle. So what does this mean for the month of April?

To get a good idea of what to expect during April let’s look back to the previous cycles of October, December, and February. That is roughly 60, 120, & 180 days…or 3 cycle periods. Typically when showing the LRC I use 500mb maps since this is where the long term long wave ridges and trough reside. In this entry I will focus on doing surface comparisons since we have 3 cycle periods to look back on. The data used is for Milwaukee.

Let’s begin by talking about a few things that stand out regarding the weather pattern in October, December, and February.

Precipitation

  • October & December above average precipitation totals. February below average precipitation, BUT above average snowfall.
  • ‘Signature’ storms in each month around the 7-9 timeframe & 20-25 timeframe.
  • Final 8-9 days of each month were wet.

Temperatures

  • Departure from average monthly temperatures October(-3.1)  December(+0.2)  February(+2.1)
  • Average to above average temperatures each month from roughly 17-25.

To summarize the 3 months, they had above average precipitation or snow. Temperatuers were cool in October, and then pretty close to average in December and February.

Now a quick glimpse at November, January, and March.

Precipitation

  • All 3 months at least 0.90″ below average or more.
  • Active periods were short.

Temperatures

  • Departure from average monthly temperatures November(+6.4) January (+1.7) March (+4.0)
  • Common warmer periods from roughly 17-24 of the month.

The surface comparisons above show a pattern, but another way to see the pattern is by looking at the Arctic Oscillation(AO). If you are wondering what the AO is…here is a great description.

The Arctic Oscillation

The Arctic Oscillation refers to opposing atmospheric pressure patterns in northern middle and high latitudes.

The oscillation exhibits a “negative phase” with relatively high pressure over the polar region and low pressure at midlatitudes (about 45 degrees North), and a “positive phase” in which the pattern is reversed. In the positive phase, higher pressure at midlatitudes drives ocean storms farther north, and changes in the circulation pattern bring wetter weather to Alaska, Scotland and Scandinavia, as well as drier conditions to the western United States and the Mediterranean. In the positive phase, frigid winter air does not extend as far into the middle of North America as it would during the negative phase of the oscillation. This keeps much of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains warmer than normal, but leaves Greenland and Newfoundland colder than usual. Weather patterns in the negative phase are in general “opposite” to those of the positive phase.

The chart below shows the AO over the past 90 days…the red lind at the very end is a forecast which we can ignoe for right now. Notice the AO was at its lowest point from December into early January, and then again in February. These were wetter months and also had temps close to average in Milwaukee. While the positive or higher points on the chart below occurred in January and March. These two months were over 1.23″ below average for precipitation and also warmer months.

Now that we have identified the patterns…what can be expected for April & May?

April Forecast

Precipitation: Above average…likely over 4.00″

Temperatures: Close to average.

Notes: Outside of the first few warm days in April, a cooler and more active weather pattern will set up. A storm around the 7-9 should once again occur. The last 8-9 days of April could bring 1″-2″ of precipitation to the area. We will also likely see some snow during the month. Quick shots of cool/cold air will likely push lows to 32 or lower at various times all month long. If you are looking to get an early start on planting this year…I would hold off for a while.

May Forecast

Precipitation: Below Average

Tempeatures: Above Average

Notes: If the trends continue this should be a warm month with below average precipitation. A warmer period may occur around the 17-24 of the month, and then a bigger warm-up the last day or two of the month that will extend into early June. This would be great news because Memorial Day is th 31st! I think a day of 85 degrees or warmer is likely sometime in May.

Thank you for reading the outlook and pattern that I am expecting over the next 2 months. If you have questions about the weather pattern, the April & May forecast, or just have some thoughts…please post them to the comments section of the blog.

Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

The Weather Pattern Repeats…Again
March 30, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News at 5, 6, & 10pm for Milwaukee’s most accurate forecast!***

Thank you for reading the Weather Watch 12 blog!  The warm weather is still on track to arrive in full force on Wednesday and Thursday with highs in the 60s and 70s.

Last Thursday we were the first station in town to begin talking about and forecasting highs in the 70s.  I was confident of a big warm-up based on the weather pattern that was going to arrive this week.  If you are new to the blog, or just need a quick refresher, I use a weather pattern theory called the LRC to help in making long range forecasts.  Here is what the theory states:

  • A unique weather pattern sets up every year between October 1st and November 10th
  • The weather pattern cycles, repeats, and continues through winter, spring and into summer. Identifying the cycle length helps tremendously when making long range weather predictions.
  • Long term long-wave troughs and ridges become established and also repeat at regular times within the cycle. These dominant repeating features are a clue to where storm systems will reach peak strength, and where they will be their weakest.
  • The LRC is a winter-long pattern! There is a pattern! It isn’t just one long-wave trough, storm system, or ridge. It is a sequence of troughs and ridges that are cycling across the Northern Hemisphere.

To put this in very simple terms, the weather pattern that occurs in October and November repeats thru the Winter, Spring, and into the Summer. The cycle length will vary each year. Determining the cycle length each Fall really holds the key in using the LRC to forecast into the future. A very good idea of the cycle length is usually determined anywhere from late November thru December. Once the pattern goes thru its second cycle a period of days can be placed on the cycle length. As I have mentioned in previous blog entries, the cycle length this year is about 60-62 days.

In Wednesday’s blog I will issue a forecast for April and May based on this theory.  The forecast will be for all of Southeast Wisconsin.

Now back to the warm-up this week and how it relates to the previous cycles in this year’s weather pattern.  Let’s look back to late November…about 120 days ago or two cycle periods and compare to our current pattern.

The best way to see the long term long wave ridges and troughs is to look at the 500mb level…which is roughly in the middle of the atmosphere.  I will label 4 numbers on each map so that you can see the same pattern exists.

Below is the 500mb archived map from November 28.  The key feature here is the large ridge over the central U.S. labeled #4. 

Now fast forwarding about 120 days or two cycle periods we arrive at our warm-up for this week.  I was even shocked when I looked at the comparison to what is about to happen!  Below is the 6Z GFS 500mp forecast map for late Wednesday.  I labeled numbers 1-4 to match with the features that I believe correspond to the map above.

Again, #4 which is a large ridge over the Mississippi Valley region is the key to our big warm-up.  The storm or trough out west labeled #3 will eventually bring us a chance of showers and thunderstorms heading into this weekend.  This same pattern also occurred around January 26-27.  Remember, the more active months of weather for Milwaukee have been October, December, and February.  This should mean a more active weather pattern may be just around the corner.

Some wilder weather may be in our near future.  I will discuss this and look at April and May as a whole in tomorrow’s blog.  Until then…enjoy the 50s for today…and 60s on Wednesday.  And if the high clouds stay away…70s on Thursday!

If you have any questions about the weather pattern or thoughts about the weather please leave them in the comments section of the blog!

Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

70s still on the way
March 29, 2010

It certainly did not warm up much today, but the well-advertised taste of summer is still heading our way. Warmer air starts its push into Wisconsin tomorrow and arrives in our area in full force on Wednesday. No record highs are expected, but who cares. It will feel great. The warmer air will come with a price as strong south and southwesterly winds are likely from Wednesday-Friday. Highs will be at or near 70 each of those days.

The weekend forecast still has some questions. Rain and maybe even a thunderstorm is possible on Saturday. At this point the storms do not look too impressive as the low pressure center will be weakening as it arrives and does not bring a large amount of instability with it.

With the warmer weather, pollen is back. Tree pollen comes first, followed by grass and then weed pollen. I have received quite a few calls about people sneezing and having itchy, watery eyes. This is most likely related to the return of allergy season. You can always get the allergy report on our web site. Go to the weather section and you will see the “pollen” icon. Take a look at today’s report.

http://www.wisn.com/weather/271121/detail.html

Juniper is leading the way and you can bet with the dry, sunny, and windy weather the pollen counts will be rising rapidly the next few days.

Another feature on wisn.com’s weather page is all of our live cameras around the area. This can be found with the “cameras” icon. My favorite camera is our newest one at Discovery World. Working in a studio without any windows, I find the cameras to be very helpful. Looking outside before you go on the air is always a good idea. Here is a direct link:

http://www.wisn.com/weather/grid.html#HEARSTWX=http%3A//www.wisn.com/weather/4406569/media.html%3Fqs%3D%3Bref%3D/weather/16955441/media.html%3Blongname%3DCameras

Enjoy the beautiful weather and thanks for reading the blog.

Mark

Get Ready For The 70s!!!!!
March 28, 2010

March has been an amazing month if you like mild weather. Our overall March temperature is 4.2 degrees above average. That is going to be going up with the very warm week ahead. March started like a lamb and it is going to end that way as well. We have received less than an inch of snow and we average 7.4 inches in March.

The last 70 degree temperature in our area came back on November7th when it was 71 degrees. The seventies are quite likely on Thursday and Friday and we will be close on Wednesday. The sunshine should be out all week. We will be a little cooler near the lake on Monday and Tuesday before the wind begins to turn to the southwest. That is the ideal wind direction for soaring spring temperatures. The southwest wind will be fairly strong on Thursday and Friday, but that should keep the lake breeze at bay.

The above image is from the GFS computer model for Thursday afternoon. The wind direction is key for everyone to warm into the 70s. If the wind is too much out of the south, the lake will actually influence the wind direction and turn it a little to the southeast.

This image is for Friday afternoon. The cooler air west will be associated with clouds and showers that will eventually move into our area on Saturday and Sunday.

Enjoy the true taste of spring this week. Thanks for reading the weather blog.

Mark

Storm Passes By & Amazing Weather Balloon Pictures!
March 27, 2010

***Watch WISN News this weekend for Milwaukee’s most accurate forecast!***

Thank you for spending a few minutes of your weekend reading the Weather Watch 12 blog! The past 2 days we have discussed the current weather conditions and also the big warm-up headed our way for the coming week. I did a quick check on Friday and we were the only station in Milwaukee forecasting a day in the 70s this week.

The warm-up heading our way this week fits the weather pattern that continues to cycle perfectly! I will go over this pattern and also issue the April & May weather forecasts this Tuesday! So check the blog for the long range forecast.

Let’s now talk about the area of low pressure moving acros the mid-Mississippi Valley right now. This storm will push a few rain showers close to our viewing area. There may be a couple of brief showers or sprinkles near the Illinois border, but I think the air is just dry enough to keep the rain out of Milwaukee. Any locations around Kenosha, Lake Geneva, or Beloit that see a shower will only pick up maybe a trace to a hundredth…not much. Rain chances overnight in these areas is only about 20%.

Here is the accumulated rainfall forecast from the 12Z GFS…this goes through early Sunday. The light green shade near the IL/WI border is around a trace. The light blue shades are 1″ or more.

By Sunday afternoon sunshine will return to the area, but winds will begin to howl out of the north-northeast at 15-25 mph with higher gusts. The slight northeast wind will keep lakeshore locations cooler on Sunday…likely in the low to mid 40s. Inland areas will top out around 50.

The big warm-up will ‘officially’ begin on Tuesday as highs race toward 60, and low 70s look good for Thursday. Keep in mind the wind will likely be in the 15-30 mph range both Wednesday and Thursday. At least it will be a warm wind.

Yesterday as I was surfing around online and found a fascinating story about a weather hobbyist(Robert Harrison) in England. The story was unique because the man bought a used camera on Ebay…attached it to a weather balloon using duct tape..and then had the camera take pictures as the balloon ascends up to 20 miles above the Earth.

Here is one picture captured from this ‘space mission’.

If you would like to view more pictures and read the entire story, just click the link below.

http://tinyurl.com/ya62c6m

If you have any thoughts or questions about the weather or the weather balloon story please leave them in the comments section of the blog. Also, make sure to join our Facebook fan page at WeatherWatch 12

Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

Weekend Storm Nearby…70s Next Week?
March 26, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News for Milwaukee’s most accurate forecast at 5, 6, & 10pm!***

The weekend is here!  Thank you for taking a few minutes to read the Weather Watch 12 blog.  Friday was another cold day across Southeast Wisconsin.  Many locations only saw highs top out in the 30s.  And with the wind blowing right off 36 degree Lake Michigan waters…Milwaukee never had a chance of getting to 40.

A couple of pieces of good news for the weekend if you like milder weather.  First, the wind will shift more to the southeast heading into Saturday.  This combined with some milder air flowing in will result in daytime highs to start the weekend in the 40s.  The winds will increase to around 10-20 mph Saturday afternoon, so it will still feel cool.

The shifting winds will be a result of a storm system passing just to our south Saturday and early Sunday.  The big question all week was whether this storm would track far enough north to provide a few rain showers to our area.  Right now it looks dry for Milwaukee and points north.  But near the Illinois border there could be a few showers or sprinkles Saturday Night or very early Sunday.

Below is the surface forecast map from the HPC showing the low position and green outlined areas which represent rain for Sunday morning at 7 a.m.  You can click on the map to enlarge, and feel free to ask any questions about the map if you are uncertain of what the symbols mean.

Behind this area of low pressure winds will increase on Sunday…likely 15-25 mph out of the north-northeast.  This means a cool day with highs in the 40s.  After another day in the 40s on Monday, temperatures are set to soar!

In yesterday’s blog I hinted at the chance of reaching 70 next Thursday.  As of this writing I am putting a forecast high of 70 in the forecast for Milwaukee.  Hitting 70 next week would mean high would be around 20 degree above average.  The record highs next Thursday and Friday are in the low 80s, I don’t think we’ll quite make it there yet. 

In order for highs to reach the 70s for a day or two here is what we need to occur.

  • Strong ridge over the mid-Mississppi Valley extending into the Southeast.  This puts us on the backside of the ridge.
  • Southwest or west winds strong enough to prevent the lake breeze from pushing inland.
  • Sunshine!  Sometimes warm days can be held back by high clouds formed by warm air advection.
  • Good mixing…meaning the warm air aloft…say 3000 feet above the ground needs to be mixed down to the surface.  Keep in mind as air descends it compresses and warms.

If these ingredients come together like I think they should…Milwaukee and all of Southeast Wisconsin stands a good chance of hitting 70 or better sometime around Thursday.

Below is a map that includes many of the things discussed above.  The map is a 850mb temperature and relative humidity map for next Thursday, April 1.  The green represent relative humidity or cloud cover.  No clouds or few are present over Southeast Wisconsin.  The temperature at 850mb will be around +15C or 59 degrees.  There is also a strong southwest wind aloft indicated by how close the black lines are to each other.

This will be something we will continue to discuss in the blog and on WISN 12 News.  Any way you look at it March should exit like a lamb with highs well above average by the middle of the week.

If you have any questions on the warm-up or on the weather, please post your thoughts and questions to the comments section of the blog.

Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

Wild Temperature Swings
March 25, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News at 5, 6, & 10pm for Milwaukee’s most accurate forecast!***

Brrrrrrrrrrrr…that is just one way to describe Thursday! Thank you for stopping by the Weather Watch 12 blog. Gusty northeast winds and temperatures falling into the 30s combined to make it feel like the teens to 20s during the afternoon hours. Wind gusts along Lake Michigan topped out between 35-40 mph.

It was cold in Southeast Wisconsin, but nothing compared to parts of the Great Lakes. Below is the surface map from around 2 p.m. Thursday. While it was 33 degrees in Milwaukee, it was only 15 degrees in Houghton and 19 in Marquette both in Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. The cold air will linger over the region for about another 24 hours.

As winds ease up by early Friday and skies become clear, temperatures will drop off quickly, especially for inland locations. This means that areas away from Lake Michigan from Fond du Lac to Brookfield to Lake Geneva will see lows in the teens, while right along the lake lows will start off in the 20-25 degree range.

After a cold start a chilly day will follow on Friday with highs again in the 30s. But just as quickly as temperatures dropped, they will warm back up next week. Right now it looks like from Tuesday to possibly Friday highs will top out somewhere in the 60s!

Below is a surface map for next Thursday from the 12Z GFS. I labeled areas across the nation’s mid-section that will see highs in the 60s, 70s, and 80s. Right now I would say there is a chance that some parts of southern Wisconsin could see highs around 70 next week! I know next Thursday is April 1…but this is no joke:)

Along with the warm conditions I would expect fairly breezy conditions as week progresses. The black lines on the map above are isobars, and the closer they are the greater the wind speed. With the isobars packed together and warmer air surging north this should result in several breezy and warm days.

So hang in there, it is cold now, but much warmer weather arrives next week. For the latest forecast updates make sure to watch WISN 12 News, and also join us on Facebook at WeatherWatch 12

Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

Strong March Cold Front…The New WISN.com
March 24, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News today at 5, 6, & 10pm for Milwaukee’s most accurate forecast!***

Thank you for stopping by the Weather Watch 12 blog.  If you missed yesterday’s blog entry I encourage you to check it out right below today’s.  Yesterday we discussed how I believe the weather pattern is repeating, and what this means heading into April.

Today it is time to focus on a strong cold front headed our way for Thursday, and also discuss the new WISN.com

Wednesday will signal the end of our mild stretch of weather in Southeast Wisconsin once the sun sets.  A cold front will race across the region on Thursday morning pushing cold temperatures and very windy conditions into our area.  Get ready for a big change!  Below is a surface forecast map from the HPC showing the cold front clearing our viewing area 7 a.m. Thursday.  Just click on the map to enlarge. 

High temperatures will likely occur early Thursday morning before the winds begin to howl off the chilly Lake Michigan waters.  And when I say howl…I’m talking northeast winds of 15-30mph!  There will be wind gusts that top 30 mph.  Temperatures will fall back into the 30s around midday in all locations.

Below is the latest temperature forecast from the NAM.  This shows the cold air pouring in near the lake at 1 p.m. on Wednesday.  The 35 degree line is right on top of Milwaukee…while farther west around Madison the 40 degree line resides.

The combination of gusty winds and falling temperatures will produce wind chill values around 20-25 degrees on Thursday.  It will be a very blustery afternoon!  You may want to grab a heavier coat before leaving for work or school on Thursday.

The one piece of good news is that milder weather will return to Southeast Wisconsin by Saturday.

When you logged on to WISN.com today you may have noticed a slight change…a new look and improved website.  The new WISN.com is easier to navigate, has more video, and also has a link to the Weather Watch 12 blog on the front page!  To access the front page blog link just click on the arrow next to weather.  A drop down menu will let you select from Interactive Radar, Almanac, Severe Weather, and the Weather Watch 12 blog.  These are just a handful of the options!  Check it out!

Also, with our recent mild days many tulips and other plants and flowers are beginning to grow or develop buds.  I have also seen many robins back from their winter break.  If you snap a picture of any of these or other signs of Spring please upload your pictures to our U-Local section.  Here are the very simple details…  

http://www.wisn.com/ulocal/22856410/detail.html

Don’t forget if you have a question or thought please leave it in the comments section.  Have a great day!

Jeremy Nelson

The Weather Pattern Continues To Repeat
March 23, 2010

***Watch WISN 12 News at 5, 6, & 10pm for the latest weather information!***

Thank you for stopping by the Weather Watch 12 blog!  If you are new to our interactive blog…welcome!  Each day we discuss a wide range of weather topics from the current days weather, to the big weather story across the U.S., or look ahead at the weather pattern.

A couple days ago one of our bloggers asked if I could discuss the weather pattern and what lies ahead.  So in today’s blog I will look back and ahead to let you know exactly what to expect coming up.

Making long range forecasts is risky business and never perfect, but a weather pattern theory known as the LRC allows for accurate long range weather forecasts to be made. LRC stands for Lezak’s Recurring Cycle.  I have been very excited to introduce this theory to viewers and bloggers here in Southeast Wisconsin.  I first learned about the theory 4 years ago while working in Kansas City. Here is what the theory states:

  • A unique weather pattern sets up every year between October 1st and November 10th
  • The weather pattern cycles, repeats, and continues through winter, spring and into summer. Identifying the cycle length helps tremendously when making long range weather predictions.
  • Long term long-wave troughs and ridges become established and also repeat at regular times within the cycle. These dominant repeating features are a clue to where storm systems will reach peak strength, and where they will be their weakest.
  • The LRC is a winter-long pattern! There is a pattern! It isn’t just one long-wave trough, storm system, or ridge. It is a sequence of troughs and ridges that are cycling across the Northern Hemisphere.

To put this in very simple terms, the weather pattern that occurs in October and November repeats thru the Winter, Spring, and into the Summer. The cycle length will vary each year. Determining the cycle length each Fall really holds the key in using the LRC to forecast into the future. A very good idea of the cycle length is usually determined anywhere from late November thru December. Once the pattern goes thru its second cycle a period of days can be placed on the cycle length. As I have mentioned in previous blog entries, the cycle length this year is about 60-62 days.

When doing a map comparison to show a previous part of the cycle to the current weather I will use 500mb maps.  A 500mb map is basically the middle of the atmosphere.  This part of the atmosphere is a good areas to pick up on the long wave pattern across the U.S.  It also eliminates surfaces effects such as friction and microclimates.  In other words this helps to focus on the overall pattern.

Let’s start by looking back to November 21 and the pattern on that date.  Below is an archived 500mb map showing many features(click on the map to enlarge).  I labeled parts of the map 1-4 to highlight areas to compare on the next map.  #1 is a compact upper low around Nova Scotia in Canada…while #2 is an upper low over the southern Plains.  #3 is a weaker trough over Canada, and #4 is a trough digging into the Western U.S.

Now according to the theory, the overall weather pattern and same general flow should exist roughly 120 days or so later…or two cycle periods.

Let’s look at the latest 500mb forecast map for March 25.  I again labeled 1-4 on the map below to correspond with what I am comparing the feature to on the map above from November 21. 

Numbers 1 and 2 are almost spot on matches to the features from November 21.  For number 3 and 4 the troughs exist, but slight position and strength differences are present, but the overall pattern is the same.  The trough near the Pacific Northwest Coast for March 25 is a little farther west than the one in November.  This slight shift and the presence of a ridge just to its east near the northern Rockies is allowing the upper low/trough over Canada to dive farthern south. 

This is just one example of the LRC, and an example of where the pattern is currently at.  Remember, the more ‘active’ months for Milwaukee and Southeast Wisconsin in terms of precipitation and temperature swings have occurred in October, December, and February.  With a roughly 60ish day cycle present…this means April will be more active and present more rain and maybe snow chances for the area compared to March.  Coming up soon I will issue a forecast for April & May!

In the meantime, please take our poll question.  The LRC is a theory(not proven yet) that states the weather pattern repeats.  What to you think?

Have a great day and make sure to post your thoughts or questions to the comments section!

Jeremy Nelson

CoCoRaHS…What is this?
March 22, 2010

Happy Monday, everyone. Another beautiful March day. We have had an incredible March so far if you like it warmer and sunnier than average. There is a lot more sun and warmth in this forecast. Tuesday will likely be the warmest day of the week with highs hitting the low 50s near the lake and 60 well inland. The forecast remains quiet much of the week. A “back-door” cold front arrives during the day on Thursday. This will drop the temps as the day progresses on Thursday. Especially near the lake. Sunday’s storm is still a big question. The GFS model keeps all the precipitation south of us, but the European and Canadian models still give us a chance of rain and snow. Stay tuned.

In the meantime, because of the quiet forecast, I thought I would introduce many of you to something called CoCoRaHS. I assume that if you are reading this blog you are a weather junkie. What I’m asking from you is that you read the attached information about this worthy project. All it takes is your weather interest and the ability to measure rain and snow. The only caveat is that you will have to buy an official rain gauge. Even if you don’t want to participate in CoCoRaHS, here at Weather Watch 12, we love to get your weather reports. Feel free to send them as a reply to this blog or by emailing us at: weather@wisn.com. Thank you. Mark

Wisconsin
Kenosha Racine Milwaukee Walworth Waukesha Jefferson Rock Green Dane Lafayette Iowa Grant Ozaukee Washington Dodge Columbia Sauk Richland Crawford Vernon Sheboygan Fond Du Lac Manitowoc Calumet Winnebago Green Lake Marquette Waushara Adams Juneau Monroe La Crosse Outagamie Waupaca Portage Wood Jackson Trempealeau Buffalo Eau Claire Pepin Pierce Door Kewaunee Brown Shawano Menominee Marathon Clark Chippewa Dunn Saint Croix Oconto Langlade Lincoln Taylor Rusk Barron Polk Oneida Prince Sawyer Washburn Burnett Marinette Florence Forest Vilas Iron Ashland Bayfield Douglas

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Welcome to CoCoRaHS-Wisconsin-
a volunteer rain/snow measuring program

General Information

CocoRaHS-Wisconsin observers provide a great volunteer service to the community, the county and the state by providing information on precipitation, snowfall, and snow depths. The information is used by government and university scientists, community officials, farmers, county emergency managers, watershed managers, drought monitors, and by your friends and neighbors.

    The only requirements for participation are:

  1. A volunteer spirit.
  2. An enthusiasm and dedication for watching the weather and daily reporting of local precipitation conditions on a systematic and timely basis. You will be asked to make your precipitation measurements around the same time every day…in general, around 6 am-8 am.
  3. Getting yourself trained and set up with the proper equipment.
  4. A computer with internet access.

Wisconsin State Coordinator
Brian Hahn – Service Hydrologist
National Weather Service – Sullivan, WI brian.hahn@noaa.gov

Additional Wisconsin Contacts
Loren Ayers
DNR- Madison, WI
Citizen-based Monitoring Network Loren.Ayers@Wisconsin.gov

Ed Hopkins
Wisconsin State Climatology office
Univ. of Wis.-Madison ejhopkin@wisc.edu

Find Your Local County Coordinator

Equipment needed and where to get it

You will be asked to use the standard manual 4″ diameter round plastic rain gauge that will hold up to 11″ of water…even if you already have some other type of manual or automated rain gauge. For an explanation of why CoCoRaHS uses the 4″ diameter rain gauge, please go here.

If you do not currently have a 4″ diameter rain gauge, you can order one from weatheryourway.com or ambientweather.com for only $25.25 plus shipping charges. This is a special price for CoCoRaHS members.

Training is required! Please review the easy-to-understand online training available on the CoCoRaHS web site. It is possible that some other forms of training may be set up in the future. If so, announcements will appear on this web page.

How to Join

Click here to go to the CoCoRaHS Application Form

Find Your Local County Coordinator

Information about building your own rain gauge measuring tube stand: http://www.cocorahs.org/Media/docs/IL/CoCoRaHS-MTS%20Plans.pdf

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