Northern Wisconsin Storm Damage

Consider yourself lucky if you live in SE Wisconsin today. We were very close to being slammed by an outbreak of severe weather that generally stayed over the northern half of the state. The closest tornadoes to us were in Friendship in Adams county and Kaukauna in Outagamie county. The tornado assessments are coming in right now from the weather service. Here is what I have seen so far.

…TWO TORNADOES CONFIRMED IN FOREST COUNTY…

A NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STORM DAMAGE SURVEY TEAM HAS CONFIRMED
TWO TORNADOES IN FOREST COUNTY.

ONE TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN 3 MILES SOUTHEAST OF ARGONNE…AND LIFTED
OFF ABOUT 2 MILES EAST OF NEWALD (IN THE FAR SOUTHWEST CORNER OF
FLORENCE COUNTY). THE PATH LENGTH WAS APPROXIMATELY 13 MILES…
WITH A DAMAGE PATH AROUND 600 YARDS WIDE. THE PRELIMINARY RATING
ON THIS TORNADO WAS EF-2…WITH MAXIMUM WINDS OF 115 MPH.

ANOTHER TORNADO TOUCHED DOWN ABOUT 4 MILES WEST OF ARMSTRONG CREEK…
AND DISSIPATED AROUND 1 MILE NORTHWEST OF ARMSTRONG CREEK. THE
PATH LENGTH WAS APPROXIMATELY 4.5 MILES…WITH A DAMAGE PATH AROUND
250 YARDS WIDE. THE PRELIMINARY RATING ON THIS TORNADO WAS EF-1…
WITH MAXIMUM WINDS AROUND 105 MPH.

THIS INFORMATION IS COURTESY OF THE STORM DAMAGE SURVEY TEAM FROM
THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE IN MARQUETTE.

…TORNADO CONFIRMED IN NORTHWEST WINNEBAGO COUNTY…

A NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STORM DAMAGE SURVEY TEAM HAS CONFIRMED
THAT AN EF-1 TORNADO CAUSED DAMAGE IN NORTHWEST WINNEBAGO COUNTY.
THE DAMAGE PATH OCCURRED FROM THE BOOM BAY AREA ON LAKE POYGAN…
EAST-NORTHEAST TO COUNTY HIGHWAY M. MUCH MORE DETAILED
INFORMATION WILL BE SENT OUT ONCE THE SURVEY TEAM RETURNS TO THE
NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE OFFICE LATER THIS AFTERNOON.
…TORNADO CONFIRMED IN KAUKAUNA…

A NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE STORM DAMAGE SURVEY TEAM HAS CONFIRMED
THAT AN EF-1 TORNADO CAUSED DAMAGE ON THE SOUTH SIDE OF KAUKAUNA
YESTERDAY EVENING. MUCH MORE DETAILED INFORMATION WILL BE SENT
OUT ONCE THE SURVEY TEAM RETURNS TO THE NATIONAL WEATHER SERVICE
OFFICE LATER THIS AFTERNOON.

The National Weather Service completed the survey of a tornado in Adams county that occurred between 612 pm and 630 pm Sunday, April 10 2011.

The first evidence of a tornado occurred 1/2 mile south of the intersection of 20th and Cumberland avenues as EF1 damage (winds of 86-109 mph) to trees. The tornado continued northeast causing damage to trees and residences. About 1/2 mile south of highway 21 and 18th avenue, lower end EF2 damage (winds 110-120 mph) began with residences and trees being affected within a 150 yard wide path. The EF2 tornado continued northeast to the intersection of Big Roche-A-Cri creek where Cottonwood lane bends north, and began to widen. The tornado damage swath was about 1/2 mile wide and of EF1 intensity south of Big Roche-A-Cri Lake along Cottonwood avenue where the tornado affected the southern portion of the town of Cottonwood. Mobile homes sustained damage there. The damage path continued east at 150 yards wide and EF1 intensity to 9th avenue about 1/2 mile north of Cottonwood avenue where it then weakened to EF0 (65-85 mph) intensity damage.

The tornado is thought to have continued east across the Colburn Wildlife area (no road access) and EF0 damage was again seen near the intersection of Chicago and 4th avenues. The tornado continued east about 2 more miles where it ended on County Road G, about 1/2 mile north of Cottonwood Lane at approximately 630 pm.

The total length of the tornado from 3 miles west of Arkdale to 5.5 miles northwest of Coloma: approximately 17 miles.

EF1 Tornado: 5 miles southwest of Hancock, WI

Of note…a second tornado began less than 1/2 mile north of the previous tornado on County G and produced EF1 damage. This tornado tracked east-northeast into Waushara county as mainly EF0 intensity, where it crossed Interstate 39 near Brown Deer Court. The tornado dissipated shortly after to the northeast.

 Here is a map with all the reported tornadoes.

I also found this Wisconsin storm report map on the internet at LaurencevilleWeather.com.

Notice the two distinct lines of damage. It is my belief, and I talked about this on Friday, that the damage path from La Crosse to the Fox Valley was created from an old boundary from the thunderstorms that moved through early Sunday morning. This created a little extra lift and additional wind shear to make the storms severe. Jeremy talked about the cap yesterday. This is an area of warmer air aloft that suppresses the thunderstorms. The cap held for us until the cold front arrived in the evening. The storm path farther north was closer to the warm front. This was also a focus for additional wind shear and helped in the genesis of supercells there.

Even though we missed out on the tornadoes, we still had a few reports of damaging winds and hail in our area. Thankfully, I have not heard of any damage. There was plenty of lightning as the storms went through and I have a few pictures to share.

Thanks to JBIZ in Sheboygan for this great lightning shot Sunday night.

Thanks to annemariesphotos on ulocal for this great shot from Middleton.

As for our forecast, enjoy the next few days of sunshine. A slow-moving low pressure center is going to hang around Thursday-Saturday bringing cold, cloudy and rainy weather. Can’t rule out a snowflake on Saturday.

Mark

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6 Responses

  1. Mark,

    Great blog post summarizing yesterday’s tornados!

    I saw on jsonline that you guys are building a new set. Can’t wait to see how it turns out and how awesome the new weather area will look!

    • Thanks, Bryan,

      We are very excited about the new set. However, I’m not excited about relocating all of our weather equipment. It is going to be an interesting couple of weeks, but I think you will like what it looks like.
      Mark

      • Hopefully the transition goes smoothly! When will it be completed?

      • It should be ready by the beginning of May. You will definitely see a big difference.
        Mark

  2. Hi!

    Mark — you used the “s” word in last night’s 10 p.m. show! Say it isn’t so!!

    I just wanted to let you know that this past Sunday, we hit 83 degrees here in Reeseville {Dodge County}. On Monday, we were at 63 degrees, which wasn’t too hard to take either. We totally missed out on the storms, other than a few minor downpours on Sunday 7 a.m. and again Sunday evening, probably around 8 or 9 p.m. Some lightning. Lots and lots of wind, but no damage. The Sunday temps didn’t only break our a sweat, but a severe case of “spring fever” too 🙂

    Will you be doing an LRC based summer season outlook, or just continue month by month?

    Have a great day!

    Don

    • Don,

      In about 2 weeks I’ll issue a forecast for May-July. The LRC fades as summer progresses, so the next 2 months we can still use it to our advantage. Some highlights coming up would be the signature storm around May 9-13, Memorial Day weekend the big warm-up returns. And then around July 1 the signature storm may pay one last visit to the area.

      Jeremy

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